Events Calendar

01 Oct
Visiting Scholar: Sara Gulgas
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Topic

Arts & Culture

Target Audience

Undergraduate Students, Staff, Alumni, Prospective Students, Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs, Residents & Fellows

University Unit
Department of Music
Hashtag

#musicatpitt

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Visiting Scholar: Sara Gulgas

Free - Musicologist Sara Gulgas (PhD 2017) will give a lecture titled  "The Expression and Reception of Emerging Adulthood in Rock" as part the Department of Music's 2020–21 Visiting Scholar Series.

This event will be livestreamed to the Music at Pitt Youtube Page.

UPDATE: If you are having trouble finding the video go to this direct link: 

https://youtu.be/itp2jkjpwA4

Abstract

Since the 1960s, music critics have questioned artists’ incorporation of baroque musical elements into rock and have charged artists with either flaunting a newfound maturity in a self-serious manner or laying pretentious claims to cultural accreditation. Both interpretations are in direct contrast to rock music’s associations with adolescent entertainment. While artists sonically referenced baroque instrumentation and style in order to evoke associations with high society, respectability, the parental generation, and/or the all-encompassing past, they also used music from the distant past to accompany lyrical expressions of nostalgia for their relatively recent childhood. The anachronism created between the music and the lyrics can be interpreted as an ironic turn away from sentimentality for the past, but it can also be interpreted as an artist’s struggle to maintain an adolescent fanbase while transitioning into adulthood. I focus on these transitional moments in the careers of the Beatles, the Beach Boys, Vampire Weekend, and Panic at the Disco as they relate to baroque rock’s inception in the 1960s and its revival in the early 2000s. I argue that baroque musical elements in rock should not be dismissed as posturing, but rather they should be heard as artistic expressions of emerging adulthood.


Sara Gulgas is an Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Arizona where she teaches courses on American popular music, the Beatles, Frank Sinatra, and jazz history. Her research interests include popular music studies, film and media studies, memory studies, and the sociology of music. She is currently working on a scholarly monograph entitled Baroque Rock and the Memory Politics of Musically Representing the Past. She has presented her research as a part of the American Musicological Society-Rock Hall Lecture Series as well as at national and international conferences. Her work has been published in IASPM-US Music Scenes, Resonance Interdisciplinary Music Journal, Bruce Springsteen and Popular Music: Essays on Rhetoric, Social Consciousness, and Contemporary Culture, and Heavy Metal at the Movies

Dial-In Information

You may need to refresh your browser if the video does not display when the lecture is scheduled to start. 

Thursday, October 1 at 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Visiting Scholar: Sara Gulgas

Free - Musicologist Sara Gulgas (PhD 2017) will give a lecture titled  "The Expression and Reception of Emerging Adulthood in Rock" as part the Department of Music's 2020–21 Visiting Scholar Series.

This event will be livestreamed to the Music at Pitt Youtube Page.

UPDATE: If you are having trouble finding the video go to this direct link: 

https://youtu.be/itp2jkjpwA4

Abstract

Since the 1960s, music critics have questioned artists’ incorporation of baroque musical elements into rock and have charged artists with either flaunting a newfound maturity in a self-serious manner or laying pretentious claims to cultural accreditation. Both interpretations are in direct contrast to rock music’s associations with adolescent entertainment. While artists sonically referenced baroque instrumentation and style in order to evoke associations with high society, respectability, the parental generation, and/or the all-encompassing past, they also used music from the distant past to accompany lyrical expressions of nostalgia for their relatively recent childhood. The anachronism created between the music and the lyrics can be interpreted as an ironic turn away from sentimentality for the past, but it can also be interpreted as an artist’s struggle to maintain an adolescent fanbase while transitioning into adulthood. I focus on these transitional moments in the careers of the Beatles, the Beach Boys, Vampire Weekend, and Panic at the Disco as they relate to baroque rock’s inception in the 1960s and its revival in the early 2000s. I argue that baroque musical elements in rock should not be dismissed as posturing, but rather they should be heard as artistic expressions of emerging adulthood.


Sara Gulgas is an Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Arizona where she teaches courses on American popular music, the Beatles, Frank Sinatra, and jazz history. Her research interests include popular music studies, film and media studies, memory studies, and the sociology of music. She is currently working on a scholarly monograph entitled Baroque Rock and the Memory Politics of Musically Representing the Past. She has presented her research as a part of the American Musicological Society-Rock Hall Lecture Series as well as at national and international conferences. Her work has been published in IASPM-US Music Scenes, Resonance Interdisciplinary Music Journal, Bruce Springsteen and Popular Music: Essays on Rhetoric, Social Consciousness, and Contemporary Culture, and Heavy Metal at the Movies

Dial-In Information

You may need to refresh your browser if the video does not display when the lecture is scheduled to start. 

Thursday, October 1 at 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

University Unit
Department of Music
Hashtag

#musicatpitt