Events Calendar

16 Jan
The Maternal Imprint: Gender, Heredity, and the Biosocial Body
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students

Tags

humanities, Humanities Center, GSWS

Website

http://humcenter.pitt.edu

University Unit
Humanities Center
Hashtag

#Humanities Center

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The Maternal Imprint: Gender, Heredity, and the Biosocial Body

The Humanities Center welcomes our Visiting Fellow Sarah Richardson (Harvard University, History of Science and Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality). 

Abstract

The rise of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease and the fetal programming hypothesis is part of a forceful reassertion, over the past decade, of wide-ranging theories of the maternal-fetal interface as a critical determinant of lifelong health and intergenerational patterns in disease distribution. Presenting a history of maternal effects science from the advent of the genetic age to today, this talk analyzes three intertwined dimensions of scientific speculations about the long reach of the maternal intrauterine imprint: interest in the power of maternal effects science to disrupt genetic determinist ideas about human fate; conceptual and empirical debate over how to study such effects given their crypticity; and, claims about the implications of maternal intrauterine effects for women’s well-being and autonomy. In each historical period, scientists’ views about what can be empirically studied, and indeed known, about human maternal effects are entangled with cultural beliefs about women’s and men’s reproductive responsibilities and shaped by scientists’ politically and historically situated convictions about the relative importance of genes or social environment to life outcomes.

 

Thursday, January 16 at 5:00 p.m.

Humanities Center, 602
Fifth Avenue at Bigelow, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

The Maternal Imprint: Gender, Heredity, and the Biosocial Body

The Humanities Center welcomes our Visiting Fellow Sarah Richardson (Harvard University, History of Science and Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality). 

Abstract

The rise of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease and the fetal programming hypothesis is part of a forceful reassertion, over the past decade, of wide-ranging theories of the maternal-fetal interface as a critical determinant of lifelong health and intergenerational patterns in disease distribution. Presenting a history of maternal effects science from the advent of the genetic age to today, this talk analyzes three intertwined dimensions of scientific speculations about the long reach of the maternal intrauterine imprint: interest in the power of maternal effects science to disrupt genetic determinist ideas about human fate; conceptual and empirical debate over how to study such effects given their crypticity; and, claims about the implications of maternal intrauterine effects for women’s well-being and autonomy. In each historical period, scientists’ views about what can be empirically studied, and indeed known, about human maternal effects are entangled with cultural beliefs about women’s and men’s reproductive responsibilities and shaped by scientists’ politically and historically situated convictions about the relative importance of genes or social environment to life outcomes.

 

Thursday, January 16 at 5:00 p.m.

Humanities Center, 602
Fifth Avenue at Bigelow, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students

University Unit
Humanities Center