Events Calendar

The Inside Scoop on Poop: Intestinal Microbiome in Cancer Immunology

This is a past event.

Diwakar Davar, MD, assistant professor of medicine (Division of Hematology/Oncology), School of Medicine, will present a Senior Vice Chancellor’s Research Seminar, “The Inside Scoop on Poop: Intestinal Microbiome in Cancer Immunology.”

Registration for the lecture is required to receive event instructions.

Topic Overview:

There is increasing awareness of the importance of gut microbiota in health and disease. Certain microbial species contribute to an “unfavorable” gut microbiota, linked to diseases like cancer, and influence outcomes to treatments, including cancer immunotherapy. By studying pre- and on-treatment samples from large cohorts of deeply phenotyped melanoma patients treated with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint therapy, Davar and colleagues observed key organisms that influenced patient outcomes and the development of immune-related adverse events. Deep metagenomic analyses uncovered novel pathways by which predominantly Gram-negative organisms influenced systemic inflammation.

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) aims to replace an unfavorable resident gut microbiota with a favorable one. Collaborating with a large group of scientists, Davar and his team performed the first-in-human trial of responder-derived FMT to treat PD-1 refractory cancer. In this experiment, Davar and colleagues demonstrated that FMT, in combination with pembrolizumab, resulted in strain engraftment in approximately 60% of patients and re-sensitized 40% of patients to anti-PD-1 therapy. The combination of FMT and pembrolizumab was well-tolerated, response was associated with reduced intra-tumoral myeloid cells, and there was evidence of increased immune activation.

Friday, December 2 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

The Inside Scoop on Poop: Intestinal Microbiome in Cancer Immunology

Diwakar Davar, MD, assistant professor of medicine (Division of Hematology/Oncology), School of Medicine, will present a Senior Vice Chancellor’s Research Seminar, “The Inside Scoop on Poop: Intestinal Microbiome in Cancer Immunology.”

Registration for the lecture is required to receive event instructions.

Topic Overview:

There is increasing awareness of the importance of gut microbiota in health and disease. Certain microbial species contribute to an “unfavorable” gut microbiota, linked to diseases like cancer, and influence outcomes to treatments, including cancer immunotherapy. By studying pre- and on-treatment samples from large cohorts of deeply phenotyped melanoma patients treated with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint therapy, Davar and colleagues observed key organisms that influenced patient outcomes and the development of immune-related adverse events. Deep metagenomic analyses uncovered novel pathways by which predominantly Gram-negative organisms influenced systemic inflammation.

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) aims to replace an unfavorable resident gut microbiota with a favorable one. Collaborating with a large group of scientists, Davar and his team performed the first-in-human trial of responder-derived FMT to treat PD-1 refractory cancer. In this experiment, Davar and colleagues demonstrated that FMT, in combination with pembrolizumab, resulted in strain engraftment in approximately 60% of patients and re-sensitized 40% of patients to anti-PD-1 therapy. The combination of FMT and pembrolizumab was well-tolerated, response was associated with reduced intra-tumoral myeloid cells, and there was evidence of increased immune activation.

Friday, December 2 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Research

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