Events Calendar

Street Art: The Reparative Labor of Commoning in Hungary

The Humanities Center welcomes Gabriella Lukacs (Anthropology). 

In Hungary, street art has emerged as a form of political activism that attracts women in large numbers. Drawing from interviews with street artists and participant observation of street art projects, this essay examines how women use street art to create productive entry points into the masculinist domain of politics in Hungary. I conceptualize street art as a practice of spatial and social commoning that calls out political power for not fulfilling its responsibility to protect and maintain the commons for the benefit of all. I theorize the labor women invest in street art projects as reparative labor and argue that while this form of labor makes political activism more inclusive, it also re-anchors women to regimes of feminized, unwaged, and invisible labor. By doing so, reparative labor forecloses the possibility for women to convert their activist labor into political capital. 

There is a precirculated paper with accompanying images for this event available hereCaitlin Bruce (Communication) and Heath Cabot (Anthropology) will both be "poaching" from this paper, which means they'll be asking how they come into conversation with the work by activating elements of it that help them re-approach or see their own work in a new way. The event is open to all, and everyone attending is invited to read the precirculated material with similar questions in mind.

Thursday, October 15 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Street Art: The Reparative Labor of Commoning in Hungary

The Humanities Center welcomes Gabriella Lukacs (Anthropology). 

In Hungary, street art has emerged as a form of political activism that attracts women in large numbers. Drawing from interviews with street artists and participant observation of street art projects, this essay examines how women use street art to create productive entry points into the masculinist domain of politics in Hungary. I conceptualize street art as a practice of spatial and social commoning that calls out political power for not fulfilling its responsibility to protect and maintain the commons for the benefit of all. I theorize the labor women invest in street art projects as reparative labor and argue that while this form of labor makes political activism more inclusive, it also re-anchors women to regimes of feminized, unwaged, and invisible labor. By doing so, reparative labor forecloses the possibility for women to convert their activist labor into political capital. 

There is a precirculated paper with accompanying images for this event available hereCaitlin Bruce (Communication) and Heath Cabot (Anthropology) will both be "poaching" from this paper, which means they'll be asking how they come into conversation with the work by activating elements of it that help them re-approach or see their own work in a new way. The event is open to all, and everyone attending is invited to read the precirculated material with similar questions in mind.

Thursday, October 15 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Humanities

University Unit
Humanities Center