Events Calendar

Shiyao Gao: Effects of Inpatient Rehabilitation

on Long-term Motor, Neuropsychological and Functional Outcomes in Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

Shiyao Gao of the Department of Epidemiology defends a dissertation entitled "Effects of inpatient rehabilitation on long-term motor, neuropsychological and functional outcomes in children with severe traumatic brain injury."

Despite growing clinician and family recognition of the need for rehabilitation in children surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a paucity of evidence to inform comprehensive rehabilitation guidelines. To advance understanding of rehabilitation care after acute medical management in children with severe TBI, we characterized the use of inpatient rehabilitation services and evaluated its associations with long-term motor, neuropsychological, behavioral, functional and quality-of-life outcomes in a multisite, multinational cohort, the Approaches and Decisions in Acute Pediatric TBI (ADAPT) trial.

First, we observed that children receiving inpatient rehabilitation, regardless of the need for additional non-inpatient rehabilitation services, had a shorter length of acute hospitalization compared to those receiving only non-inpatient rehabilitation. Children from the US were more likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation compared with children from the UK. Among the US cohort, whites were more likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation compared with African Americans. Further research is warranted to clarify the reasons behind observed disparities in the use of inpatient rehabilitation.

Next, using inverse probability weighting to adjust for confounding and selection biases, we found no differences between children receiving inpatient rehabilitation and children receiving only non-inpatient rehabilitation in tests of motor skills, intellectual functioning, verbal learning, memory, processing speed, cognitive flexibility and parent/guardian-rated executive function and behaviors at 12 months after injury.

Then, a similar analytical approach was used to examine the associations of receiving inpatient rehabilitation versus only non-inpatient rehabilitation with global function and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) at 12 months after injury. Both the confounder only-adjusted analysis and the analysis further accounting for selection biases demonstrated that children receiving inpatient rehabilitation had more favorable global function among those with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 13 at hospital discharge, though such association was not observed in children with a higher GCS. No differences between rehabilitation groups in parent/guardian-reported or child self-reported HRQOL were found. These results likely reflect the benefits of inpatient rehabilitation for children with more severely impaired consciousness when medically stable.

Overall, the dissertation findings provided the much-needed evidence on the characteristics associated with the use of inpatient rehabilitation and the effects of different patterns of rehabilitation care on long-term outcomes in children with severe TBI. Moreover, these results are of public health relevance by providing a strong foundation for the development and implementation of policies or clinical practice to optimize rehabilitation care for children with severe TBI.

Committee members and departments:

  • Dr. Stephen R. Wisniewski, Epidemiology
  • Dr. Anthony Fabio, Epidemiology
  • Dr. Sue R. Beers, Psychiatry
  • Dr. M. Kathleen Kelly, Physical Therapy
  • Dr. Bedda L. Rosario, IBM Watson Health, IBM

Dial-In Information

Meeting ID: 970 3001 9279 Password: 717784

Dial +12678310333,,97030019279# US or 8778535247,,97030019279# US Toll-free. Find your local number: https://pitt.zoom.us/u/acAvjbJawG.

Friday, July 17 at 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Shiyao Gao: Effects of Inpatient Rehabilitation

on Long-term Motor, Neuropsychological and Functional Outcomes in Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

Shiyao Gao of the Department of Epidemiology defends a dissertation entitled "Effects of inpatient rehabilitation on long-term motor, neuropsychological and functional outcomes in children with severe traumatic brain injury."

Despite growing clinician and family recognition of the need for rehabilitation in children surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a paucity of evidence to inform comprehensive rehabilitation guidelines. To advance understanding of rehabilitation care after acute medical management in children with severe TBI, we characterized the use of inpatient rehabilitation services and evaluated its associations with long-term motor, neuropsychological, behavioral, functional and quality-of-life outcomes in a multisite, multinational cohort, the Approaches and Decisions in Acute Pediatric TBI (ADAPT) trial.

First, we observed that children receiving inpatient rehabilitation, regardless of the need for additional non-inpatient rehabilitation services, had a shorter length of acute hospitalization compared to those receiving only non-inpatient rehabilitation. Children from the US were more likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation compared with children from the UK. Among the US cohort, whites were more likely to receive inpatient rehabilitation compared with African Americans. Further research is warranted to clarify the reasons behind observed disparities in the use of inpatient rehabilitation.

Next, using inverse probability weighting to adjust for confounding and selection biases, we found no differences between children receiving inpatient rehabilitation and children receiving only non-inpatient rehabilitation in tests of motor skills, intellectual functioning, verbal learning, memory, processing speed, cognitive flexibility and parent/guardian-rated executive function and behaviors at 12 months after injury.

Then, a similar analytical approach was used to examine the associations of receiving inpatient rehabilitation versus only non-inpatient rehabilitation with global function and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) at 12 months after injury. Both the confounder only-adjusted analysis and the analysis further accounting for selection biases demonstrated that children receiving inpatient rehabilitation had more favorable global function among those with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 13 at hospital discharge, though such association was not observed in children with a higher GCS. No differences between rehabilitation groups in parent/guardian-reported or child self-reported HRQOL were found. These results likely reflect the benefits of inpatient rehabilitation for children with more severely impaired consciousness when medically stable.

Overall, the dissertation findings provided the much-needed evidence on the characteristics associated with the use of inpatient rehabilitation and the effects of different patterns of rehabilitation care on long-term outcomes in children with severe TBI. Moreover, these results are of public health relevance by providing a strong foundation for the development and implementation of policies or clinical practice to optimize rehabilitation care for children with severe TBI.

Committee members and departments:

  • Dr. Stephen R. Wisniewski, Epidemiology
  • Dr. Anthony Fabio, Epidemiology
  • Dr. Sue R. Beers, Psychiatry
  • Dr. M. Kathleen Kelly, Physical Therapy
  • Dr. Bedda L. Rosario, IBM Watson Health, IBM

Dial-In Information

Meeting ID: 970 3001 9279 Password: 717784

Dial +12678310333,,97030019279# US or 8778535247,,97030019279# US Toll-free. Find your local number: https://pitt.zoom.us/u/acAvjbJawG.

Friday, July 17 at 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Event Type

Defenses

Topic

Research