Events Calendar

22 Apr
Dr. M. Lisa Manning - How do Single Cells Program Collective Behavior at the Scale of Tissues and Organs?
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Topic

Research

Target Audience

Undergraduate Students, Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

Website

https://www.engineering.pitt.edu/Depa...

University Unit
Department of Bioengineering
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Dr. M. Lisa Manning - How do Single Cells Program Collective Behavior at the Scale of Tissues and Organs?

Seminar Speaker 

Dr. M. Lisa Manning, PhD

Department of Physics - Syracuse University 

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, properly programmed collective cell motion is required to form tissues and organs, and this programming breaks down in diseases like cancer. Recent experimental work highlights that some organisms tune the global mechanical properties of a tissue across a fluid-solid transition. In the fluid phase, cells change neighbors and the global shape of the tissue deforms, while in the solid phase cell motion is prohibited and the tissue responds elastically via stretching and buckling. What is the physical origin of such rigidity transitions and how do cells control them? I will discuss our theoretical and computational work to understand what causes these transitions, and show experimental data demonstrating that our theoretical predictions with no fit parameters explain detailed features of body axis elongation in the fruit fly and the architecture and dynamics of epithelial cell culture. I’ll also highlight how tissue mechanics may be controlling organogenesis and signaling in the left-right organizer of the developing zebrafish embryo.

Bio

M. Lisa Manning is the Kenan Professor of Physics at Syracuse University and founding Director of BioInspired Syracuse: Institute for Material and Living Systems. She is an interdisciplinary scientist studying the mechanical properties of biological tissues and the failure of disordered materials. Her work to understand how the global mechanics of tissues impact cell migration and pattern formation provides new insight into embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer. Her work to understand fundamental excitations in disordered solids generates better predictive models for flow and failure in materials from glasses to earthquake faults.  

She earned her B.S. in Physics and B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Virginia in 2002, before attending graduate school at UC Santa Barbara, where she earned a Ph.D. in Physics in 2008, advised by Jean Carlson and James Langer. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science from 2008 until she joined faculty at Syracuse University in 2011. Prof. Manning has given over 100 invited talks and published 50 peer-reviewed articles. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and was highlighted as one of Science News “Top 10 Scientists under 40”, and has received additional honors and awards including the 2018 APS Maria Goeppert Mayer Award, the 2016 IUPAP Young Investigator Prize, a Simons Investigator award, a Sloan Fellowship, a Scialog award, as well as several teaching awards.  As an NSF CAREER awardee and a Cottrell Scholar, she has also developed innovative programs to help recruit and retain a diverse group of scientists in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields. 

Presenter's Website

https://mmanning.expressions.syr.edu/

Thursday, April 22 at 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Dr. M. Lisa Manning - How do Single Cells Program Collective Behavior at the Scale of Tissues and Organs?

Seminar Speaker 

Dr. M. Lisa Manning, PhD

Department of Physics - Syracuse University 

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, properly programmed collective cell motion is required to form tissues and organs, and this programming breaks down in diseases like cancer. Recent experimental work highlights that some organisms tune the global mechanical properties of a tissue across a fluid-solid transition. In the fluid phase, cells change neighbors and the global shape of the tissue deforms, while in the solid phase cell motion is prohibited and the tissue responds elastically via stretching and buckling. What is the physical origin of such rigidity transitions and how do cells control them? I will discuss our theoretical and computational work to understand what causes these transitions, and show experimental data demonstrating that our theoretical predictions with no fit parameters explain detailed features of body axis elongation in the fruit fly and the architecture and dynamics of epithelial cell culture. I’ll also highlight how tissue mechanics may be controlling organogenesis and signaling in the left-right organizer of the developing zebrafish embryo.

Bio

M. Lisa Manning is the Kenan Professor of Physics at Syracuse University and founding Director of BioInspired Syracuse: Institute for Material and Living Systems. She is an interdisciplinary scientist studying the mechanical properties of biological tissues and the failure of disordered materials. Her work to understand how the global mechanics of tissues impact cell migration and pattern formation provides new insight into embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer. Her work to understand fundamental excitations in disordered solids generates better predictive models for flow and failure in materials from glasses to earthquake faults.  

She earned her B.S. in Physics and B.A. in Mathematics from the University of Virginia in 2002, before attending graduate school at UC Santa Barbara, where she earned a Ph.D. in Physics in 2008, advised by Jean Carlson and James Langer. She worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science from 2008 until she joined faculty at Syracuse University in 2011. Prof. Manning has given over 100 invited talks and published 50 peer-reviewed articles. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and was highlighted as one of Science News “Top 10 Scientists under 40”, and has received additional honors and awards including the 2018 APS Maria Goeppert Mayer Award, the 2016 IUPAP Young Investigator Prize, a Simons Investigator award, a Sloan Fellowship, a Scialog award, as well as several teaching awards.  As an NSF CAREER awardee and a Cottrell Scholar, she has also developed innovative programs to help recruit and retain a diverse group of scientists in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields. 

Presenter's Website

https://mmanning.expressions.syr.edu/

Thursday, April 22 at 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Research