Events Calendar

Neutrino Faculty Candidate Seminar: Zoya Vallari (Caltech)

This is a past event.

Title  Exploring the Neutrino Sector with Long-Baseline Experiments

Abstract: The detection of neutrino oscillations provided conclusive evidence that neutrinos have mass, confirming physics beyond the Standard Model. In the past two decades, neutrino oscillation experiments have made significant progress in measuring neutrino mixing. However, key questions such as the mass ordering of the neutrinos and whether neutrinos violate charge-parity remain unanswered. Long-baseline oscillation experiments continue to provide a rich environment to explore such aspects of fundamental physics.

The NOvA and T2K experiments are currently operational accelerator-based long-baseline experiments, while the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is the next-generation experiment that will be based in the US. DUNE will feature the most intense accelerator neutrino beam worldwide and achieve extraordinary precision by employing and advancing liquid argon (LAr) detector technology.

In this talk, I will present the latest results from the NOvA and the T2K experiments, providing an overview of the current neutrino oscillation measurements. I will also discuss the status of the joint-fit analysis of the NOvA and T2K data, which will provide a tighter statistical constraint and be useful for breaking degeneracies in the individual measurements. Additionally, I will outline DUNE's physics program and objectives, as well as describe the ongoing prototype efforts to test the novel techniques that will be used in DUNE detectors.

Dial-In Information

Department members, see email for remote access. Non-department members, contact paugrad@pitt.edu for access or join the Physics & Astronomy Events Newsletter

Monday, February 13 at 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Thaw Hall, 102
3943 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Neutrino Faculty Candidate Seminar: Zoya Vallari (Caltech)

Title  Exploring the Neutrino Sector with Long-Baseline Experiments

Abstract: The detection of neutrino oscillations provided conclusive evidence that neutrinos have mass, confirming physics beyond the Standard Model. In the past two decades, neutrino oscillation experiments have made significant progress in measuring neutrino mixing. However, key questions such as the mass ordering of the neutrinos and whether neutrinos violate charge-parity remain unanswered. Long-baseline oscillation experiments continue to provide a rich environment to explore such aspects of fundamental physics.

The NOvA and T2K experiments are currently operational accelerator-based long-baseline experiments, while the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is the next-generation experiment that will be based in the US. DUNE will feature the most intense accelerator neutrino beam worldwide and achieve extraordinary precision by employing and advancing liquid argon (LAr) detector technology.

In this talk, I will present the latest results from the NOvA and the T2K experiments, providing an overview of the current neutrino oscillation measurements. I will also discuss the status of the joint-fit analysis of the NOvA and T2K data, which will provide a tighter statistical constraint and be useful for breaking degeneracies in the individual measurements. Additionally, I will outline DUNE's physics program and objectives, as well as describe the ongoing prototype efforts to test the novel techniques that will be used in DUNE detectors.

Dial-In Information

Department members, see email for remote access. Non-department members, contact paugrad@pitt.edu for access or join the Physics & Astronomy Events Newsletter

Monday, February 13 at 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Thaw Hall, 102
3943 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213

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