Events Calendar

Molecular Toxicology Journal Club

EOH student Meghan Matlack will present the article:

"AeDES: a next-generation monitoring and forecasting system for environmental suitability of Aedes-borne disease transmission"

Muñoz ÁG, Chourio X, Rivière-Cinnamond A, Diuk-Wasser MA, Kache PA, Mordecai EA, Harrington L, Thomson MC

Abstract
Aedes-borne diseases, such as dengue and chikungunya, are responsible for more than 50 million infections worldwide every year, with an overall increase of 30-fold in the last 50 years, mainly due to city population growth, more frequent travels and ecological changes. In the United States of America, the vast majority of Aedes-borne infections are imported from endemic regions by travelers, who can become new sources of mosquito infection upon their return home if the exposed population is susceptible to the disease, and if suitable environmental conditions for the mosquitoes and the virus are present. Since the susceptibility of the human population can be determined via periodic monitoring campaigns, the environmental suitability for the presence of mosquitoes and viruses becomes one of the most important pieces of information for decision makers in the health sector. We present a next-generation monitoring and forecasting system for [Formula: see text]-borne diseases' environmental suitability (AeDES) of transmission in the conterminous United States and transboundary regions, using calibrated ento-epidemiological models, climate models and temperature observations. After analyzing the seasonal predictive skill of AeDES, we briefly consider the recent Zika epidemic, and the compound effects of the current Central American dengue outbreak happening during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, to illustrate how a combination of tailored deterministic and probabilistic forecasts can inform key prevention and control strategies.


PLEASE SUPPORT OUR STUDENT PRESENTERS

Organized by Dr. Nicholas Fitz of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, this weekly course is designed to expose EOH students to the newest and most exciting research in a diverse set of topics related to toxicology.  Guests are welcome.

Dial-In Information

Contact Dr. Nicholas Fitz (nffitz@pitt.edu) for Zoom information to attend.

Thursday, September 10 at 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Molecular Toxicology Journal Club

EOH student Meghan Matlack will present the article:

"AeDES: a next-generation monitoring and forecasting system for environmental suitability of Aedes-borne disease transmission"

Muñoz ÁG, Chourio X, Rivière-Cinnamond A, Diuk-Wasser MA, Kache PA, Mordecai EA, Harrington L, Thomson MC

Abstract
Aedes-borne diseases, such as dengue and chikungunya, are responsible for more than 50 million infections worldwide every year, with an overall increase of 30-fold in the last 50 years, mainly due to city population growth, more frequent travels and ecological changes. In the United States of America, the vast majority of Aedes-borne infections are imported from endemic regions by travelers, who can become new sources of mosquito infection upon their return home if the exposed population is susceptible to the disease, and if suitable environmental conditions for the mosquitoes and the virus are present. Since the susceptibility of the human population can be determined via periodic monitoring campaigns, the environmental suitability for the presence of mosquitoes and viruses becomes one of the most important pieces of information for decision makers in the health sector. We present a next-generation monitoring and forecasting system for [Formula: see text]-borne diseases' environmental suitability (AeDES) of transmission in the conterminous United States and transboundary regions, using calibrated ento-epidemiological models, climate models and temperature observations. After analyzing the seasonal predictive skill of AeDES, we briefly consider the recent Zika epidemic, and the compound effects of the current Central American dengue outbreak happening during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, to illustrate how a combination of tailored deterministic and probabilistic forecasts can inform key prevention and control strategies.


PLEASE SUPPORT OUR STUDENT PRESENTERS

Organized by Dr. Nicholas Fitz of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, this weekly course is designed to expose EOH students to the newest and most exciting research in a diverse set of topics related to toxicology.  Guests are welcome.

Dial-In Information

Contact Dr. Nicholas Fitz (nffitz@pitt.edu) for Zoom information to attend.

Thursday, September 10 at 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Event Type

Virtual

Topic

Research