Events Calendar

23 Sep
Investigating Malaria Parasite Biology and Immune Responses
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Topic

Research

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

University Unit
Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
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Investigating Malaria Parasite Biology and Immune Responses

 in Areas with Varying P. falciparum Transmission Intensities

IDM SEMINAR SERIES

Prof. Gordon Awandare is the Director of West African Center for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens (WACCBIP ). His research focuses on the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children. There are two main branches of investigations, namely the role of the host immune response on one hand, and the mechanisms used by the parasite to propagate itself and cause disease. From the perspective of the host, they have been investigating the production of inflammatory mediators and the relationship between genetic variation in innate immune response genes and susceptibility to severe malaria in children. Their research on the Plasmodium parasite is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms used for invasion of red blood cells. Therefore, a substantial aspect of our research efforts focus on characterizing the sialic acid-independent pathways of invasion and identifying novel receptors and ligands involved.

Dial-In Information

Join Zoom Meeting https://pitt.zoom.us/j/92122763815 Meeting ID: 921 2276 3815

Wednesday, September 23 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Investigating Malaria Parasite Biology and Immune Responses

 in Areas with Varying P. falciparum Transmission Intensities

IDM SEMINAR SERIES

Prof. Gordon Awandare is the Director of West African Center for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens (WACCBIP ). His research focuses on the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in children. There are two main branches of investigations, namely the role of the host immune response on one hand, and the mechanisms used by the parasite to propagate itself and cause disease. From the perspective of the host, they have been investigating the production of inflammatory mediators and the relationship between genetic variation in innate immune response genes and susceptibility to severe malaria in children. Their research on the Plasmodium parasite is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms used for invasion of red blood cells. Therefore, a substantial aspect of our research efforts focus on characterizing the sialic acid-independent pathways of invasion and identifying novel receptors and ligands involved.

Dial-In Information

Join Zoom Meeting https://pitt.zoom.us/j/92122763815 Meeting ID: 921 2276 3815

Wednesday, September 23 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Research

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs