Events Calendar

03 Oct
Identity Politics, New Criticism and the Civil Rights Movement
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc., Forums, Readings

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students

Tags

humanities, colloquium

Website

http://humcenter.pitt.edu

Group
Pittwire, University Times, @Pitt
University Unit
Humanities Center
Hashtag

#PittCreates

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Identity Politics, New Criticism and the Civil Rights Movement

Join the Humanities Center at our Thursday colloquia. We're having Tyrone Williams (Xavier, English) to discuss his written work, prepared responses by several faculty experts on the topic and then an open discussion among the participants and the audience. The respondents will be Charles Legere (Carnegie Museum) and Lauren Russell (Pitt, English). 

Although the concept of identity politics has been linked to minority groups by critics on all sides of the political spectrum, I argue that identity politics orients the general history of the United States. More narrowly, the concept links two important movements in USA history, one literary (the rise and professionalization of criticism) and one social (the long Civil Rights Movement). Finally, this link does not suggest that these are "American"; on the contrary, the concept of identity politics underlying each derives from several national sources, destabilizing the very concept itself.

Access the reading>>

Thursday, October 3 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Humanities Center, 602
Fifth Avenue at Bigelow, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Identity Politics, New Criticism and the Civil Rights Movement

Join the Humanities Center at our Thursday colloquia. We're having Tyrone Williams (Xavier, English) to discuss his written work, prepared responses by several faculty experts on the topic and then an open discussion among the participants and the audience. The respondents will be Charles Legere (Carnegie Museum) and Lauren Russell (Pitt, English). 

Although the concept of identity politics has been linked to minority groups by critics on all sides of the political spectrum, I argue that identity politics orients the general history of the United States. More narrowly, the concept links two important movements in USA history, one literary (the rise and professionalization of criticism) and one social (the long Civil Rights Movement). Finally, this link does not suggest that these are "American"; on the contrary, the concept of identity politics underlying each derives from several national sources, destabilizing the very concept itself.

Access the reading>>

Thursday, October 3 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Humanities Center, 602
Fifth Avenue at Bigelow, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students

University Unit
Humanities Center
Hashtag

#PittCreates