Events Calendar

01 Oct
Cathedral
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Topic

Research

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

University Unit
Department of Human Genetics
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Human Genetics Seminar - Rannar Airik, PhD

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Developmental Biology, Pitt

Macrophage depletion mitigates portal fibrosis and cholestatic liver disease in ANKS6-deficient livers

Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF) is a developmental liver disease that is caused by mutations in genes that encode for ciliary proteins and is characterized by bile duct dysplasia and portal fibrosis. Recent work has demonstrated that mutations in ANKS6 can cause CHF due to its role in bile duct development. Here, we report a novel ANKS6 mutation, which was identified in an infant presenting with neonatal jaundice due to underlying biliary abnormalities and liver fibrosis. Molecular analysis revealed that ANKS6 liver pathology is associated with the infiltration of bone marrow-derived CCR2+ macrophages to the periportal fibrotic tissue and ductal epithelium. To further investigate the role of macrophages in the pathophysiology of CHF we generated a liver specific Anks6 knockout mouse model. The mutant mice develop biliary abnormalities and rapidly progressing periportal fibrosis reminiscent of human CHF. The fibrogenic changes coincided with the accumulation of inflammatory monocytes and macrophages in the mutant liver. Gene expression and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the preponderance of M1-like over M2-like macrophages at the onset of fibrosis. A critical role for macrophages in promoting peribiliary fibrosis was demonstrated by depleting the macrophages with chlodronate liposomes which effectively reduced inflammatory gene expression and fibrosis, and ameliorated tissue histology and biliary function in Anks6 KO livers. Together, this study demonstrates that macrophages play an important role in the initiation of liver fibrosis in ANKS6-deficient livers and their therapeutic elimination may provide an avenue to mitigate CHF in patients.

Friday, October 1 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

G23 PUBHL

Human Genetics Seminar - Rannar Airik, PhD

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Developmental Biology, Pitt

Macrophage depletion mitigates portal fibrosis and cholestatic liver disease in ANKS6-deficient livers

Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF) is a developmental liver disease that is caused by mutations in genes that encode for ciliary proteins and is characterized by bile duct dysplasia and portal fibrosis. Recent work has demonstrated that mutations in ANKS6 can cause CHF due to its role in bile duct development. Here, we report a novel ANKS6 mutation, which was identified in an infant presenting with neonatal jaundice due to underlying biliary abnormalities and liver fibrosis. Molecular analysis revealed that ANKS6 liver pathology is associated with the infiltration of bone marrow-derived CCR2+ macrophages to the periportal fibrotic tissue and ductal epithelium. To further investigate the role of macrophages in the pathophysiology of CHF we generated a liver specific Anks6 knockout mouse model. The mutant mice develop biliary abnormalities and rapidly progressing periportal fibrosis reminiscent of human CHF. The fibrogenic changes coincided with the accumulation of inflammatory monocytes and macrophages in the mutant liver. Gene expression and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the preponderance of M1-like over M2-like macrophages at the onset of fibrosis. A critical role for macrophages in promoting peribiliary fibrosis was demonstrated by depleting the macrophages with chlodronate liposomes which effectively reduced inflammatory gene expression and fibrosis, and ameliorated tissue histology and biliary function in Anks6 KO livers. Together, this study demonstrates that macrophages play an important role in the initiation of liver fibrosis in ANKS6-deficient livers and their therapeutic elimination may provide an avenue to mitigate CHF in patients.

Friday, October 1 at 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

G23 PUBHL

Topic

Research

Target Audience

Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

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