Events Calendar

25 Feb
Colloquium: Divine Data: Miracles of Mary in Early Modern Germany
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc., Virtual

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Alumni, Faculty, Graduate Students

University Unit
Humanities Center
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Colloquium: Divine Data: Miracles of Mary in Early Modern Germany

Sarah Reiff Conell, History of Art and Architecture

In the sixteenth century, cults of the Virgin Mary were host to violent conflicts as well as loci of cohesion. These sites surrounding miracle working images produced information systems in the form of images, publications, and institutional archives, which made concrete the arguments of heavenly favor that rallied Catholics and offered defense against Protestant attacks in standardized form. A network of human actors mobilized to create and structure records that embedded and reified a contested viewpoint. All data are from the past, and early modern information systems offer valuable insights into the tumultuous context from which they originated. In the age of Martin Luther, the Germanic South (now comprising Austria, Switzerland, and Bavaria) was troubled by potential Islamic incursions and host to explosive moments of violence against marginal communities. Amid such turmoil, local populations established procedures and categories as they gathered information about miraculous images – including data about the people, objects, and repetitive behaviors associated with cult sites.

In her prefatory talk, Conell will begin to put this historical research in conversation with this article In the discussion following, we will discuss the possibilities of using Quantitative Narrative Analysis to investigate miracles that were recorded in the 16th century. Attendees are invited to access the reading and some framing questions here.

Thursday, February 25 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Colloquium: Divine Data: Miracles of Mary in Early Modern Germany

Sarah Reiff Conell, History of Art and Architecture

In the sixteenth century, cults of the Virgin Mary were host to violent conflicts as well as loci of cohesion. These sites surrounding miracle working images produced information systems in the form of images, publications, and institutional archives, which made concrete the arguments of heavenly favor that rallied Catholics and offered defense against Protestant attacks in standardized form. A network of human actors mobilized to create and structure records that embedded and reified a contested viewpoint. All data are from the past, and early modern information systems offer valuable insights into the tumultuous context from which they originated. In the age of Martin Luther, the Germanic South (now comprising Austria, Switzerland, and Bavaria) was troubled by potential Islamic incursions and host to explosive moments of violence against marginal communities. Amid such turmoil, local populations established procedures and categories as they gathered information about miraculous images – including data about the people, objects, and repetitive behaviors associated with cult sites.

In her prefatory talk, Conell will begin to put this historical research in conversation with this article In the discussion following, we will discuss the possibilities of using Quantitative Narrative Analysis to investigate miracles that were recorded in the 16th century. Attendees are invited to access the reading and some framing questions here.

Thursday, February 25 at 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Humanities

Target Audience

Alumni, Faculty, Graduate Students

University Unit
Humanities Center