Events Calendar

05 Mar
Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Target Audience

Undergraduate Students, Alumni, Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

University Unit
Department of Anthropology
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Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology

Please join us for the second lecturer in the speaker series, “Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology,” which will be hosted by Pitt Anthropology in years 2020-21 as part of the department Colloquium. 

This speaker series features leading anthropologists and archaeologists who have sought to illuminate and contest legacies of oppression, both in their research and other aspects of their professional life. It will bring to the department a range of knowledge and expertise not currently represented in Pitt Anthropology, and enable a wider discussion regarding how to rethink our approach to intellectual work, teaching, mentoring, and engagement with our communities.

Being a Good Relation: Enacting Indigenous Archaeologies

Kisha Supernant, University of Alberta

Abstract: Non-Indigenous archaeologists have long studied Indigenous pasts, using frameworks from western understandings of the world to tell Indigenous histories. For example, previous research on the archaeology and history of the Métis Nation in Canada has focused on mixedness, hybridity, and creolization as the defining feature of Métis culture and identity. These concepts are grounded in racialized understandings of identity, not a personhood and nationhood framework. Archaeology must therefore be unsettled to make space for other ways of knowing, as many of the existing theories and methods are unable to account for Indigenous ways of knowing and being. At the core of enacting Indigenous archaeologies is learning how to be a good relation, both to living beings and those who came before. As an example, I outline a Métis theoretical and methodological approach to the Métis archaeological record, woven through two concepts: wahkohtowin (interrelatedness) and kîhokewin (visiting). Drawing on examples from research on Métis wintering sites, I discuss the implications of these concepts for how I excavate, analyse, interpret, and care for the belongings of my ancestors, before reflecting on my vision for an archaeology that is attentive and responsive to Indigenous communities.

Dial-In Information

Please contact Sloane Kozyak, SHK124@pitt.edu, for the Zoom link. 

Friday, March 5 at 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology

Please join us for the second lecturer in the speaker series, “Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology,” which will be hosted by Pitt Anthropology in years 2020-21 as part of the department Colloquium. 

This speaker series features leading anthropologists and archaeologists who have sought to illuminate and contest legacies of oppression, both in their research and other aspects of their professional life. It will bring to the department a range of knowledge and expertise not currently represented in Pitt Anthropology, and enable a wider discussion regarding how to rethink our approach to intellectual work, teaching, mentoring, and engagement with our communities.

Being a Good Relation: Enacting Indigenous Archaeologies

Kisha Supernant, University of Alberta

Abstract: Non-Indigenous archaeologists have long studied Indigenous pasts, using frameworks from western understandings of the world to tell Indigenous histories. For example, previous research on the archaeology and history of the Métis Nation in Canada has focused on mixedness, hybridity, and creolization as the defining feature of Métis culture and identity. These concepts are grounded in racialized understandings of identity, not a personhood and nationhood framework. Archaeology must therefore be unsettled to make space for other ways of knowing, as many of the existing theories and methods are unable to account for Indigenous ways of knowing and being. At the core of enacting Indigenous archaeologies is learning how to be a good relation, both to living beings and those who came before. As an example, I outline a Métis theoretical and methodological approach to the Métis archaeological record, woven through two concepts: wahkohtowin (interrelatedness) and kîhokewin (visiting). Drawing on examples from research on Métis wintering sites, I discuss the implications of these concepts for how I excavate, analyse, interpret, and care for the belongings of my ancestors, before reflecting on my vision for an archaeology that is attentive and responsive to Indigenous communities.

Dial-In Information

Please contact Sloane Kozyak, SHK124@pitt.edu, for the Zoom link. 

Friday, March 5 at 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Virtual Event

University Unit
Department of Anthropology