Events Calendar

13 Nov
Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology
Event Type

Lectures, Symposia, Etc.

Target Audience

Undergraduate Students, Alumni, Faculty, Graduate Students, Postdocs

Tags

Social Justice

University Unit
Department of Anthropology
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Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology

Please join us for the first lecturer in the speaker series, “Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology,” which will be hosted by Pitt Anthropology in years 2020-21 as part of the department Colloquium. 

This speaker series features leading anthropologists and archaeologists who have sought to illuminate and contest legacies of oppression, both in their research and other aspects of their professional life. It will bring to the department a range of knowledge and expertise not currently represented in Pitt Anthropology, and enable a wider discussion regarding how to rethink our approach to intellectual work, teaching, mentoring, and engagement with our communities.

Following the research talk and Q and A, Professor Thayer will take part in a discussion with attendees regarding the wider themes of the speaker series. 

How Social inequities Create Health Inequities:
An Integration of Social and Biological Mechanisms

Zaneta Thayer,
Dartmouth College

Abstract: A remarkably consistent pattern of human variation is the social gradient in health. This is the observation that, both within and between societies, individuals who are socially disadvantaged tend to have poorer health outcomes and shorter life expectancy than individuals who are more socially advantaged. In this talk I will use data from Aotearoa New Zealand and the United States to discuss how exposure to early life stressors can shape inequities in health across the life course. I will also explore why environmental sensitivity to early life stress may have evolved in the first place. Finally, I will discuss the potential role of historical trauma in shaping contemporary health inequities. The results of this work have implications for our understanding of how and why the social gradient in health has emerged.

Bio: Dr. Thayer is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. She received her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Northwestern University where she was also a Presidential Fellow. Her research is focused on understanding both how and why early life environments shape patterns of human biology and health. Her goal is to produce scholarship of interest to evolutionary anthropologists, public health practitioners, and the populations she works with. In 2020 she was awarded the Michael A. Little Early Career Award from the Human Biology Association.

 

Dial-In Information

Please contact Sloane Kozyak, SHK124@pitt.edu, for the Zoom link. 

Friday, November 13 at 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology

Please join us for the first lecturer in the speaker series, “Diversity, Decolonization, and the Discipline of Anthropology,” which will be hosted by Pitt Anthropology in years 2020-21 as part of the department Colloquium. 

This speaker series features leading anthropologists and archaeologists who have sought to illuminate and contest legacies of oppression, both in their research and other aspects of their professional life. It will bring to the department a range of knowledge and expertise not currently represented in Pitt Anthropology, and enable a wider discussion regarding how to rethink our approach to intellectual work, teaching, mentoring, and engagement with our communities.

Following the research talk and Q and A, Professor Thayer will take part in a discussion with attendees regarding the wider themes of the speaker series. 

How Social inequities Create Health Inequities:
An Integration of Social and Biological Mechanisms

Zaneta Thayer,
Dartmouth College

Abstract: A remarkably consistent pattern of human variation is the social gradient in health. This is the observation that, both within and between societies, individuals who are socially disadvantaged tend to have poorer health outcomes and shorter life expectancy than individuals who are more socially advantaged. In this talk I will use data from Aotearoa New Zealand and the United States to discuss how exposure to early life stressors can shape inequities in health across the life course. I will also explore why environmental sensitivity to early life stress may have evolved in the first place. Finally, I will discuss the potential role of historical trauma in shaping contemporary health inequities. The results of this work have implications for our understanding of how and why the social gradient in health has emerged.

Bio: Dr. Thayer is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. She received her PhD in Biological Anthropology from Northwestern University where she was also a Presidential Fellow. Her research is focused on understanding both how and why early life environments shape patterns of human biology and health. Her goal is to produce scholarship of interest to evolutionary anthropologists, public health practitioners, and the populations she works with. In 2020 she was awarded the Michael A. Little Early Career Award from the Human Biology Association.

 

Dial-In Information

Please contact Sloane Kozyak, SHK124@pitt.edu, for the Zoom link. 

Friday, November 13 at 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

University Unit
Department of Anthropology