Events Calendar

07 Dec
Dissertation Defense: Renee Anderko
Event Type

Defenses

University Unit
Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
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Dissertation Defense: Renee Anderko

This is a past event.

"NK cell memory and help in HIV infection" 

Public Health/Infectious Diseases and Microbiology

Committee:
Robbie Maillard (advisor)
Simon Barratt-Boyes
Charles Rinaldo
Walt Storkus
Diana Metes

 

Abstract:

While natural killer (NK) cells are lauded for their killing effector function, they also play a critical role as immune helper cells, responding with great flexibility to environmental cues to provide subsequent alarm signals crucial for shaping and regulating the adaptive immune response. Most recently, the concept of immunological memory has been extended to NK cells, with the emergence of an inflated population of NK cells deficient in FcRg (FcRg) described in the setting of HIV-1 infection. The physiological relevance of FcRg NK cells, including their relationship with HIV-1-associated chronic inflammatory events, and their potential to be targeted to improve HIV-1 control, are poorly understood. Here, I present an in-depth analysis of the impact of chronic HIV-1 infection and long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the phenotypic and functional character of NK cells, with particular attention directed toward characterizing FcRg NK cells and exploring the reciprocal crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to enhance cellular-mediated immunity to HIV-1. Although NK cells are capable of providing immune help in response to innate stimuli during ART-mediated viral suppression, HIV-1 infection accelerates the expansion of highly differentiated FcRg NK ‘effector’ memory cells with limited function. By specializing in antibody-specific responses, FcRg NK cells compromise their responsiveness to DC-derived innate stimuli, leading to qualitative differences in their helper function and crosstalk with DCs. However, the potential exists for exploiting the inflated populations of FcRg NK cells in chronic HIV-1 infection to facilitate the induction of DC-mediated cellular immunity to HIV-1 via broadly neutralizing HIV-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) due to their superior antibody-dependent reactivity. Improving our understanding of the specialized nature of FcRg memory-like NK cells will be imperative for optimizing interventions to improve health outcomes and the effectiveness of HIV-1 therapies.

Dial-In Information

Register for Zoom information. 

Tuesday, December 7 at 3:30 p.m.

Public Health, A115
130 Desoto Street, Pittsburgh, 15261

Dissertation Defense: Renee Anderko

"NK cell memory and help in HIV infection" 

Public Health/Infectious Diseases and Microbiology

Committee:
Robbie Maillard (advisor)
Simon Barratt-Boyes
Charles Rinaldo
Walt Storkus
Diana Metes

 

Abstract:

While natural killer (NK) cells are lauded for their killing effector function, they also play a critical role as immune helper cells, responding with great flexibility to environmental cues to provide subsequent alarm signals crucial for shaping and regulating the adaptive immune response. Most recently, the concept of immunological memory has been extended to NK cells, with the emergence of an inflated population of NK cells deficient in FcRg (FcRg) described in the setting of HIV-1 infection. The physiological relevance of FcRg NK cells, including their relationship with HIV-1-associated chronic inflammatory events, and their potential to be targeted to improve HIV-1 control, are poorly understood. Here, I present an in-depth analysis of the impact of chronic HIV-1 infection and long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the phenotypic and functional character of NK cells, with particular attention directed toward characterizing FcRg NK cells and exploring the reciprocal crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to enhance cellular-mediated immunity to HIV-1. Although NK cells are capable of providing immune help in response to innate stimuli during ART-mediated viral suppression, HIV-1 infection accelerates the expansion of highly differentiated FcRg NK ‘effector’ memory cells with limited function. By specializing in antibody-specific responses, FcRg NK cells compromise their responsiveness to DC-derived innate stimuli, leading to qualitative differences in their helper function and crosstalk with DCs. However, the potential exists for exploiting the inflated populations of FcRg NK cells in chronic HIV-1 infection to facilitate the induction of DC-mediated cellular immunity to HIV-1 via broadly neutralizing HIV-1-specific monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) due to their superior antibody-dependent reactivity. Improving our understanding of the specialized nature of FcRg memory-like NK cells will be imperative for optimizing interventions to improve health outcomes and the effectiveness of HIV-1 therapies.

Dial-In Information

Register for Zoom information. 

Tuesday, December 7 at 3:30 p.m.

Public Health, A115
130 Desoto Street, Pittsburgh, 15261

Event Type

Defenses

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