Events Calendar

Colloquium: Anja Metelmann, Freie Universitat (FU) Berlin

 

The Power of Parametric Effects in Engineered Quantum Systems
 

Parametric couplings offers the exciting possibility to manipulate and control interactions between engineered quantum systems. Such systems are artificial mesoscopic systems whose dynamics are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Prominent examples of these mesoscopic systems are ultracold trapped atoms and ions, superconducting circuits and electro/optomechanical systems. Parametric modulation allows us to bring such engineered quantum systems of different energy scales into communication with each other, and provides us with the possibility to engineer coherent and dissipative processes among them. Dissipative processes are here rather special, as they are indirect processes mediated via a damped auxiliary system. In so-called dissipation engineering protocols one designs an environment in favor of a desired outcome. This includes the fascinating aspect of turning dissipation, which in general limits the performance of an experiment, into an advantageous tool. The concept of dissipation engineering has enriched the methods available for state preparation, dissipative quantum computing and quantum information processing. Combining such engineered dissipative processes with coherent dynamics allows for new effects to emerge. For example, we found that any factorisable (coherent) Hamiltonian interaction can be rendered nonreciprocal if balanced with the corresponding dissipative interaction. This powerful concept can be exploited to engineer nonreciprocal devices for quantum information processing, computation and communication protocols, e.g., to achieve control over the direction of propagation of photonic signals. In this talk I will introduce the basic concept and show how one can engineer reciprocal and nonreciprocal parametric amplifiers with improved characteristics over conventional setups.

 

Dial-In Information

https://pitt.zoom.us/j/96909910071

 

 

Thursday, April 8 at 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Colloquium: Anja Metelmann, Freie Universitat (FU) Berlin

 

The Power of Parametric Effects in Engineered Quantum Systems
 

Parametric couplings offers the exciting possibility to manipulate and control interactions between engineered quantum systems. Such systems are artificial mesoscopic systems whose dynamics are governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Prominent examples of these mesoscopic systems are ultracold trapped atoms and ions, superconducting circuits and electro/optomechanical systems. Parametric modulation allows us to bring such engineered quantum systems of different energy scales into communication with each other, and provides us with the possibility to engineer coherent and dissipative processes among them. Dissipative processes are here rather special, as they are indirect processes mediated via a damped auxiliary system. In so-called dissipation engineering protocols one designs an environment in favor of a desired outcome. This includes the fascinating aspect of turning dissipation, which in general limits the performance of an experiment, into an advantageous tool. The concept of dissipation engineering has enriched the methods available for state preparation, dissipative quantum computing and quantum information processing. Combining such engineered dissipative processes with coherent dynamics allows for new effects to emerge. For example, we found that any factorisable (coherent) Hamiltonian interaction can be rendered nonreciprocal if balanced with the corresponding dissipative interaction. This powerful concept can be exploited to engineer nonreciprocal devices for quantum information processing, computation and communication protocols, e.g., to achieve control over the direction of propagation of photonic signals. In this talk I will introduce the basic concept and show how one can engineer reciprocal and nonreciprocal parametric amplifiers with improved characteristics over conventional setups.

 

Dial-In Information

https://pitt.zoom.us/j/96909910071

 

 

Thursday, April 8 at 5:00 p.m.

Virtual Event

Topic

Research