Events Calendar

A Federal Courts Symposium in Honor of Professor Arthur Hellman

This is a past event.

Professor Hellman’s scholarly work about the federal courts spans many different topics. But there is a recurring theme: investigation of the institutional arrangements affecting the judiciary and the relation between those arrangements and the decisions made by the judges. Underlying this theme is the recognition that outcomes—whether at the Supreme Court, in the U.S. Courts of Appeals, or in judicial misconduct proceedings—are determined not by the substance of the issues but also by the processes in which judges, litigants, and Congress engage.

To illustrate, Professor Hellman has empirically investigated the internal and external forces that shape the Supreme Court’s selection of cases for plenary consideration. He has analyzed the nature and extent of conflicts between federal judicial circuits and has explored the theory and practice of precedent within a circuit. He has written about the allocation of jurisdiction between federal and state courts and has explored the interaction between Congress and the judiciary in creating a system for handling complaints of misconduct or disability on the part of federal judges.

Professor Hellman has not only written about the institutional arrangements governing the federal courts; he has also played a role in shaping those arrangements. He has helped draft sections of the Judicial Code relating to federal jurisdiction and complaints against judges, and he was the leading academic opponent of proposals to create an Intercircuit Tribunal and to divide the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

This symposium will draw on Professor Hellman’s scholarship to explore four broad topics: the Design of the Supreme Court, the Design of the U.S. Courts of Appeals, Federal Jurisdiction, and Judicial Ethics. Leading academics, federal judges, policy analysts, and practitioners will engage in a stimulating and thoughtful exchange of ideas about the federal courts.

The event will be held at the Barco Law Building in the Teplitz Memorial Moot Courtroom on Friday, April 5, 2024, with an option to attend virtually. Attendance is free for all registrants. 

This symposium is free to those not seeking CLE credit.This program has been approved by PACLE for 6 hours of CLE credit (4 substantive and 2 ethics). There will be a $250 fee for CLE credit for this event if you attend in person and $150 if you attend virtually.

View the event agenda here.

Tune in on Zoom here.

Friday, April 5 at 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Barco Law Building, Teplitz Memorial Moot Courtroom
3900 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

A Federal Courts Symposium in Honor of Professor Arthur Hellman

Professor Hellman’s scholarly work about the federal courts spans many different topics. But there is a recurring theme: investigation of the institutional arrangements affecting the judiciary and the relation between those arrangements and the decisions made by the judges. Underlying this theme is the recognition that outcomes—whether at the Supreme Court, in the U.S. Courts of Appeals, or in judicial misconduct proceedings—are determined not by the substance of the issues but also by the processes in which judges, litigants, and Congress engage.

To illustrate, Professor Hellman has empirically investigated the internal and external forces that shape the Supreme Court’s selection of cases for plenary consideration. He has analyzed the nature and extent of conflicts between federal judicial circuits and has explored the theory and practice of precedent within a circuit. He has written about the allocation of jurisdiction between federal and state courts and has explored the interaction between Congress and the judiciary in creating a system for handling complaints of misconduct or disability on the part of federal judges.

Professor Hellman has not only written about the institutional arrangements governing the federal courts; he has also played a role in shaping those arrangements. He has helped draft sections of the Judicial Code relating to federal jurisdiction and complaints against judges, and he was the leading academic opponent of proposals to create an Intercircuit Tribunal and to divide the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

This symposium will draw on Professor Hellman’s scholarship to explore four broad topics: the Design of the Supreme Court, the Design of the U.S. Courts of Appeals, Federal Jurisdiction, and Judicial Ethics. Leading academics, federal judges, policy analysts, and practitioners will engage in a stimulating and thoughtful exchange of ideas about the federal courts.

The event will be held at the Barco Law Building in the Teplitz Memorial Moot Courtroom on Friday, April 5, 2024, with an option to attend virtually. Attendance is free for all registrants. 

This symposium is free to those not seeking CLE credit.This program has been approved by PACLE for 6 hours of CLE credit (4 substantive and 2 ethics). There will be a $250 fee for CLE credit for this event if you attend in person and $150 if you attend virtually.

View the event agenda here.

Tune in on Zoom here.

Friday, April 5 at 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Barco Law Building, Teplitz Memorial Moot Courtroom
3900 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

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