Events Calendar

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Journal Club

This is a past event.

EOH student Jessie Klousnitzer will present the article:

Air pollution could drive global dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes

by Zhu G, Wang X, Yang T, Su J, Qin Y, Wang S, Gillings M, Wang C, Ju F, Lan B, Liu C, Li H, Long XE, Wang X, Jetten MSM, Wang Z, Zhu YGMiao Y, Zheng Y, Geng Y, Yang L, Cao N, Dai Y, Wei

Abstract
Antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health. Several dispersal mechanisms have been described, but transport of both microbes and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) via atmospheric particles has received little attention as a pathway for global dissemination. These atmospheric particles can return to the Earth's surface via rain or snowfall, and thus promote long-distance spread of ARGs. However, the diversity and abundance of ARGs in fresh snow has not been studied and their potential correlation with particulate air pollution is not well explored. Here, we characterized ARGs in 44 samples of fresh snow from major cities in China, three in North America, and one in Europe, spanning a gradient from pristine to heavily anthropogenically influenced ecosystems. High-throughput qPCR analysis of ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) provided strong indications that dissemination of ARGs in fresh snow could be exacerbated by air pollution, severely increasing the health risks of both air pollution and ARGs. We showed that snowfall did effectively spread ARGs from point sources over the Earth surface. Together our findings urge for better pollution control to reduce the risk of global dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR STUDENT PRESENTERS

Organized by Dr. Nicholas Fitz of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, this weekly course is designed to expose EOH students to the newest and most exciting research in a diverse set of topics related to toxicology.  Guests are welcome.  If a Zoom link is needed, please email nffitz@pitt.edu.

Thursday, February 24 at 11:00 a.m.

Public Health, A425
130 Desoto Street, Pittsburgh, 15261

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Journal Club

EOH student Jessie Klousnitzer will present the article:

Air pollution could drive global dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes

by Zhu G, Wang X, Yang T, Su J, Qin Y, Wang S, Gillings M, Wang C, Ju F, Lan B, Liu C, Li H, Long XE, Wang X, Jetten MSM, Wang Z, Zhu YGMiao Y, Zheng Y, Geng Y, Yang L, Cao N, Dai Y, Wei

Abstract
Antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health. Several dispersal mechanisms have been described, but transport of both microbes and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) via atmospheric particles has received little attention as a pathway for global dissemination. These atmospheric particles can return to the Earth's surface via rain or snowfall, and thus promote long-distance spread of ARGs. However, the diversity and abundance of ARGs in fresh snow has not been studied and their potential correlation with particulate air pollution is not well explored. Here, we characterized ARGs in 44 samples of fresh snow from major cities in China, three in North America, and one in Europe, spanning a gradient from pristine to heavily anthropogenically influenced ecosystems. High-throughput qPCR analysis of ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) provided strong indications that dissemination of ARGs in fresh snow could be exacerbated by air pollution, severely increasing the health risks of both air pollution and ARGs. We showed that snowfall did effectively spread ARGs from point sources over the Earth surface. Together our findings urge for better pollution control to reduce the risk of global dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

PLEASE SUPPORT OUR STUDENT PRESENTERS

Organized by Dr. Nicholas Fitz of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, this weekly course is designed to expose EOH students to the newest and most exciting research in a diverse set of topics related to toxicology.  Guests are welcome.  If a Zoom link is needed, please email nffitz@pitt.edu.

Thursday, February 24 at 11:00 a.m.

Public Health, A425
130 Desoto Street, Pittsburgh, 15261

Event Type

Virtual

Topic

Research

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